Does Penis Size Have Anything To Do With Female Orgasm?

How To Give A Woman Pleasure During Intercourse!

The vagina has a lot of nerve endings throughout its length -- a fact which contradicts the commonly quoted statement that the vagina is comparatively insensitive -- so it may well be that a larger penis is able to stimulate it more than a smaller one.

Therefore, some researchers investigated whether or not a man's ability to give a woman an orgasm through penile-vaginal intercourse was related in any way to the size of the penis of her partner.

The research was conducted in 2008 with a sample of women representative of the Czech population over the age of 15.

The researchers provided a written survey to all women who agreed to take part asking about their age, how often they experienced orgasm during penile-vaginal intercourse.

Or, I suppose, whether a man had ever given a woman an orgasm. Apparently it was clearly specified that this related simply to orgasm produced by thrusting of the penis and vagina without additional stimulation from fingers or sex toys.

They also asked questions about what the women were taught during sex education about the method of reaching orgasm and about their preference for penis size and the estimated length of foreplay and sexual intercourse in minutes.

They were also asked if they were more likely to have an orgasm with a man who had a longer or shorter than average penis.

The measuring device was a 200 Crown Czech banknote - which was 14.5 cm long; this was assumed to represent the length of the average erect male penis. In fact, that is about right, give or take a smidgen.

(This may be a misplaced question, for a lot of women regard penile girth as more important than length in producing satisfying sensations during sexual intercourse.)

You can read a whole lot more about sex techniques and positions here, including advice for men with a long and short penis about the best sex positions for their pleasure, and the best sex positions to give a woman an orgasm.

The women had a variety of answers available to them for all these questions on a four or five point scale.

Analysis of the answers were used to calculate any correlation between a woman's ability to have a vaginal orgasm and her age, duration of foreplay, the length of intercourse, her ability to focus on the sensations she was receiving from her vagina, and on the length of her partner's penis.

Obviously some of these women did not have enough experience to be able to make comparisons between partners, a factor that was taken into account in the analysis.

The researchers also applied multiple regression analysis to these factors to work out relationships between vaginal orgasm and one or more of the potential sources of stimulation.

The researchers used 1000 women  -  a response rate of 53% - and of these 1000 women 917 provided information about vaginal orgasm; the remainder either had never had a vaginal orgasm or they chose not to answer that question.

Now here's the first problem for me: the women's answers suggest that 50% of women reach orgasm during intercourse, and over 80% had had what they called a vaginal orgasm.

These are numbers that do not match much more widely quoted figures available on the Internet.

Anyway, pressing on, of 416 women, 142 reported that they were more likely to experience vaginal orgasm with a longer than average penis, while 242 claimed that they reached orgasm equally well with both long and short penises.

The final 32 said that they reached orgasm more easily when the penis was short.

(The implication is that the bigger a penis, the more nerve endings it can stimulate in the vagina.)

Women who were taught in sex ed that stimulation of the vagina was capable of producing orgasm said they had more vaginal orgasms that women who were not given this information. But the problem with this conclusion is that it relies on the women's memory - a very unreliable methodological tool.

The researchers make the observation that previous work has suggested that "investment" in the clitoris is a barrier to the development of adult female sexual responsivity.

And maybe it is, because it may prejudice women against the idea of learning about vaginal orgasm - or even make it harder to help vaginally anorgasmic women to experience orgasm during intercourse.

Kestenberg suggested that a woman's resistance to the concept of vaginal orgasm evolved in a two-stage process: first, a woman relies on clitoral stimulation to reach orgasm, and secondly defends against feeling, mechanisms which both impair her ability to reach vaginal orgasm.

The researchers observed that women who have been given a view of female sexuality based on the clitoris as the centre of orgasmic response have impaired ability to have a vaginal orgasm.

The discoverer of the G spot, Perry, said as long ago as 1984 that for the past 30 years most gynecologists have been telling women that the vaginal orgasm does not exist, and the consequence of that is that fewer and fewer of them were actually having vaginal orgasms.

Perry called this one of the most heinous iatrogenic illnesses ever perpetrated on Western civilization.

He also said that learning to masturbate by using only the clitoris as a means of sexual stimulation, which he claimed had been basically the way women had been taught to masturbate for 30 years, was in fact preventing women from developing normal vaginal sensitivity.

Needless to say the researchers in the current paper used this to support their conclusions.

It's a startling thought that women are being deprived of vaginal orgasm just because of the way society has culturally and socially framed their sexuality.

And men, too, fall prey to this belief system, not even trying to give a woman an orgasm by vaginal stimulation because they simply don't know it's possible to do so.....although, if they troubled to educate themselves on the finer points of sexual techniques, they would soon find out. Pellicer's Tao Of Badass is a great place to start looking for dating tips for men.

Maybe that's why women who were taught that the vagina is an important region for female orgasm claimed a higher level of vaginal orgasm than those who learned that the clitoris is "where it's all at"!

The researchers observed that a woman whose view of female orgasm centers on the clitoris has an impaired ability to achieve orgasm during partnered sex, but her general orgasmic function is not affected.

We should deal with the objection to the idea that women can come through vaginal orgasm during intercourse due to indirect clitoral stimulation.

Circumstantial evidence against this idea is the fact that penile stimulation of the vagina, and especially of the cervix, stimulates not only the pudendal nerve activated by the clitoris, but also the pelvic, hypogastric, and vagus nerves, which do not show significant stimulation from the region of the clitoris.

Indeed, stimulation of both the cervix and the vagina in woman with complete spinal cord injury (which means that the brain has no connection to the clitoris, but receives stimulation apparently from the vagus nerve which is induced by the penis buffeting the woman's cervix) can lead to orgasm.

The researchers observed that the vagus nerve has also got an association with processes of attention, emotional regulation, and possibly even pair bonding.

And because the vagus nerve has parasympathetic cardiovascular effects, it isn't too surprising that people who had had penile vagina intercourse in the two weeks before a laboratory stress test showed lower blood pressure reactivity and faster blood-pressure recovery than those who had not have sexual activity.

It's not hard to see a physiological basis to explain how a woman who regularly has vaginal orgasms will be more relaxed and happy, and able to enter more fully into relationship and partnership with a man.

The researchers make the rather cynical observation that post-Kinsey doctrinaire attempts to inculcate a belief in the general population that penile length has no significance during intercourse are refuted by the "widespread acceptance" that penis size (length) is important (and maybe it is - to men......!)

(Although how they reached the conclusion that there is such a "widespread" acceptance is not stated).

Using this implicit acceptance -- the origin of which is not specified -- as the base for that argument they then go on to say that even if a particular penis is not long enough to stimulate the cervix and uterus, a woman can still have a vaginal orgasm from stimulation of those parts of the vagina nearer the opening.

They baldly state that the evidence of their research shows that women who are qualified to make the comparison (that is to say by virtue of the number of sexual partners they have had) state that they are more likely to have an orgasm during penile-vaginal intercourse with a long penis with a short one.

(They also speculate that men with a long penis might be better lovers, which a statement that takes this research from the realms of science into fantasy.)

Even more fantastical, they conclude that the orgasmic consistency of a woman is in fact associated with the duration of penile-vaginal intercourse but not with the duration of foreplay.

That runs counter to every woman's experience that I've ever heard about, which leads me to believe that while some parts of this study may be accurate, others are definitely speculative.

And if you still cannot achieve orgasm.....well, perhaps the way to go is to use treatment for sexual dysfunction - you can often find this online.

Sidebar: For men with premature ejaculation issues, it is vital to get good information about premature ejaculation control for men, so you can overcome this problem and last longer in bed.

Needless to say, stopping premature ejaculation is tricky - if it wasn't, then more men would do it! Yet this may be the key for a man who wants to know how to give a woman an orgasm during sex.

Controlling ejaculation can be like stopping a runaway train - it carries on until it crashes off the rails...you therefore need to get some help: maybe online counseling, or a personal therapist who can tell you how to control your ejaculation, how to give a woman orgasm, how to make her come before you enter her, and how to pleasure her as she needs during intercourse.

In general however their conclusions are sound: that sex education, sexual medicine, and social policy need not only to be supportive of women's health, but also to be supportive of the concept of vaginal orgasm.

I would go further: even if vaginal orgasm does not exist (although I believe very firmly that it does), it is inappropriate to educate women to believe that the clitoris is the only source of sexual stimulation.

For one thing, both the routine experience of women during sex and ample scientific research demonstrate that a woman has a more powerful orgasm when clitoral stimulation is supplemented by stimulation on the area of the G spot.

That much is obvious to any man who gives any woman an orgasm on a regular basis!

And it's also true that some sexual positions will be more effective than others at stimulating the G spot - though of course it also depends to some extent on the shape and size of the man's penis.

The Kama Sutra's sex advice recognized this centuries ago - by observing that a man with small genitals needs to have sex with a similar woman, and that matches between men and women with very different sized genitals would not provide pleasure.

However, having said that, the researchers' intentions are in the right place (propagating the view that the G spot exists), for they make the observation that many North American university courses -- even women's studies courses -- include as standard, texts that falsely claim that vaginal orgasm doesn't exist or is very rare.

Because the vaginal orgasm is  considered to be a myth created by a patriarchal view of female sexuality - thanks to Freud and his followers.

There is certainly a wide range of empirical evidence, and anecdotal evidence, that demonstrates those anti-vaginal orgasm statements are false.

More importantly, if the conclusions about the benefits of vaginal orgasm stated in their study are true, these assumptions are also damaging to women's health in general and sexual health and well-being in particular.

Assertions that vaginal orgasms are a myth alienate women from men and from their own sexual well-being and sexual enjoyment.

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And here's a bit of fun - How to Fake An Orgasm Video - "Advice" For Women